Coronavirus - Strange times

all new Phil
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I feel quite insensitive asking this but I’m going to anyway. Is Long Covid actually a thing?
Thought this was a nice forum, clearly not.
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rob
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all new Phil wrote: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 11.20 I feel quite insensitive asking this but I’m going to anyway. Is Long Covid actually a thing?
I thought I had Long Covid until a few weeks ago. I was still showing signs of the symptoms 6 months on from having Covid, so I was sent for blood tests, and it turned out I was Type 2 diabetic.
bilky asko
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all new Phil wrote: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 11.20 I feel quite insensitive asking this but I’m going to anyway. Is Long Covid actually a thing?
Long Covid is not well-defined yet because it's still a condition that hasn't been well-studied. Having long-lasting effects, or sequelae, of a disease is not a new thing - what isn't known is what actually comes under the umbrella of Long Covid.

As Rob rightly points out, there are some cases where Long Covid will be presumed when it's actually another condition altogether. Long Covid is currently used to cover a massive range of symptoms across many categories, so it's not surprising that conditions that have relatively generic symptoms, can be missed - diabetes being among them.

The ONS have found that approximately 10% of Covid infections result in symptoms that go beyond 12 weeks. It would be absolutely incredible if every single one of them, or even a majority of them, weren't actually Long Covid and were something else. So yes, it is most definitely a thing. But as time goes on and our knowledge improves, the definition will be refined.
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all new Phil
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Thanks both and you’ve kind of got to the bottom of my concern. It’s become such a catch-all term with undefined symptoms that I fear it’s become both a diagnosis for what turns out to be something else, or (and possibly the same thing) a label to put onto generally feeling low. There was someone being interviewed on the news earlier about it, and how she has brain fog and feels tired all the time etc, and I couldn’t help but wonder if it was just the consequences of an unhealthy lifestyle that she was describing. Am I a bad person for thinking that? It’s not a criticism or a judgement, and I’m definitely not saying that this is what all cases are, but sometimes we allow people to have easy answers rather than the right ones.
Thought this was a nice forum, clearly not.
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Beep
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all new Phil wrote: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 15.49 Thanks both and you’ve kind of got to the bottom of my concern. It’s become such a catch-all term with undefined symptoms that I fear it’s become both a diagnosis for what turns out to be something else, or (and possibly the same thing) a label to put onto generally feeling low. There was someone being interviewed on the news earlier about it, and how she has brain fog and feels tired all the time etc, and I couldn’t help but wonder if it was just the consequences of an unhealthy lifestyle that she was describing. Am I a bad person for thinking that? It’s not a criticism or a judgement, and I’m definitely not saying that this is what all cases are, but sometimes we allow people to have easy answers rather than the right ones.
It's a fair point to be honest; for instance we are subject to annual fitness testing at work (at varying levels for various roles) - on a recent refresher for a particular skill a colleague failed the fitness test at a level far below the standard for normal duties, which she passed 2 weeks before... She blamed Long Covid, citing dizziness and lethargy, as well as a shortness of breath and I'm not for a second saying it's not a possibility - it could be as simple as she isn't exercising and is leading an unhealthy lifestyle. She had Covid in March last year, and had 2 weeks off and was back afterwards, obviously enough isn't known about Long Covid as to whether or not it would be affecting you 14 months down the line.

I suffered from Covid in March last year, and every now and then I suffer from shortness of breath - is that long Covid or because I've not been going out and exercising as much as I used to?

Coronavirus in general has become an excuse to many; delays in healthcare - Covid, can't get through to customer services - Covid, delays in the Criminal Justice System - Covid. Is Long Covid going to be the excuse of the future? I don't know.
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cdd
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I get the impression that it’s the same as people not getting better after any illness. In that a proportion have some complication (pretty easy to see and explain), a proportion have mental health issues (hardly surprising), and possibly a tiny number have a weird complication. As opposed to the ongoing furore in which a majority have a weird complication, a minority have a nice ordinary complication, and zero have mental health issues.
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Neil
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all new Phil wrote: Thu 05 Aug, 2021 15.49 There was someone being interviewed on the news earlier about it, and how she has brain fog and feels tired all the time etc, and I couldn’t help but wonder if it was just the consequences of an unhealthy lifestyle that she was describing. Am I a bad person for thinking that? It’s not a criticism or a judgement, and I’m definitely not saying that this is what all cases are, but sometimes we allow people to have easy answers rather than the right ones.
I fail to see how this can't be read as critical or judgemental, to be honest.
Jonwo
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Ive always wondered if other illnesses affect people more than others but simply don’t reported about
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