End of MAY

all new Phil
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sun 13 Feb, 2005 00.04
Location: Next door to Hell

Thu 13 Jun, 2019 21.44

bilky asko wrote:
Thu 13 Jun, 2019 20.01
all new Phil wrote:
Sat 25 May, 2019 21.40
I’ve stuck a tenner on Esther McVey, got it at 80/1. She’s taking it seriously.
Commiserations on losing that tenner.
It was a punt. She could have gathered some momentum but her LGBT comments didn’t help and ultimately Lorraine finished her off I think.
*ass
wells
Posts: 731
Joined: Sun 31 Jul, 2005 14.52

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 08.49

She is a lightweight who comes across as very cold. I think she may have picked up handful more votes if it wasn’t for the events of last week but she was never going to go far.

I’m sure she’ll have appealed to average Daily Mail/Daily Express reader with unsubstantiated claims though.


I can only imagine how she’d fair against someone like James O’Brien.

I think the Tories need Rory Stewart, as he’s the only one in the centre ground and I think he’s the only one that could deliver a comfortable majority. But he’s not Brexity enough for the membership at the moment. But next time round however when the Tories aren’t doing well especially if Brexit’s gone badly they’ll probably decide they need someone like him.
all new Phil
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sun 13 Feb, 2005 00.04
Location: Next door to Hell

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 10.39

It’s not just the Tories who need Rory Stewart, it’s the country. He seems to be one of the only ones on either side of the political spectrum right now who can operate respectfully - either Johnson or Corbyn as leader would cause massive division. Everyone else is too angry as well.
*ass
wells
Posts: 731
Joined: Sun 31 Jul, 2005 14.52

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 11.00

I agree with you on Rory Stewart.

I wouldn’t say Corbyn ever really operates disrespectfully. He suffers from a type of scrutiny politicians on the right do not.

That said I don’t think he would make a good prime minster.
all new Phil
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sun 13 Feb, 2005 00.04
Location: Next door to Hell

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 11.28

wells wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 11.00
I agree with you on Rory Stewart.

I wouldn’t say Corbyn ever really operates disrespectfully. He suffers from a type of scrutiny politicians on the right do not.

That said I don’t think he would make a good prime minster.
The man himself isn’t particularly disrespectful but fuck me, the people who surround him are probably some of the coarsest and divisive in politics.
*ass
simonipswich1
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat 30 Apr, 2016 00.24

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 12.42

Just a thought and I don't know if it would be possible. The day before the new leader is announced, could May go to Buckingham Palace and ask for permission to dissolve Parliament trigging a General Election? It is said that the Queen doesn't get involved really in politics and leaves that up to her Prime Minister?
all new Phil
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sun 13 Feb, 2005 00.04
Location: Next door to Hell

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 13.31

simonipswich1 wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 12.42
Just a thought and I don't know if it would be possible. The day before the new leader is announced, could May go to Buckingham Palace and ask for permission to dissolve Parliament trigging a General Election? It is said that the Queen doesn't get involved really in politics and leaves that up to her Prime Minister?
For what reason?
*ass
User avatar
tillyoshea
Posts: 331
Joined: Sun 23 Nov, 2003 14.34
Location: Newcastle upon Tyne
Contact:

Sun 16 Jun, 2019 17.17

simonipswich1 wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 12.42
Just a thought and I don't know if it would be possible. The day before the new leader is announced, could May go to Buckingham Palace and ask for permission to dissolve Parliament trigging a General Election? It is said that the Queen doesn't get involved really in politics and leaves that up to her Prime Minister?
No. The Prime Minister lost the prerogative to reuqest a dissolution of Parliament under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act. It now requires a vote of two-thirds of the Commons (or a situation where the Government loses a confidence vote and there is a period of two weeks where no alternative Government emerges to command the confidence of the Commons).

I mean, I'm sure the monarch could theoretically dissolve a Parliament at will, but we'd be well into Charles I territory if it happened in the circumstances outlined.

And - as Phil says - why would May want to do that anyway?!
bilky asko
Posts: 1113
Joined: Sat 08 Nov, 2008 19.48

Mon 17 Jun, 2019 00.42

all new Phil wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 10.39
It’s not just the Tories who need Rory Stewart, it’s the country. He seems to be one of the only ones on either side of the political spectrum right now who can operate respectfully - either Johnson or Corbyn as leader would cause massive division. Everyone else is too angry as well.
Please don't bet on him, you'll lose another tenner.
Image
all new Phil
Posts: 1541
Joined: Sun 13 Feb, 2005 00.04
Location: Next door to Hell

Mon 17 Jun, 2019 09.06

bilky asko wrote:
Mon 17 Jun, 2019 00.42
all new Phil wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 10.39
It’s not just the Tories who need Rory Stewart, it’s the country. He seems to be one of the only ones on either side of the political spectrum right now who can operate respectfully - either Johnson or Corbyn as leader would cause massive division. Everyone else is too angry as well.
Please don't bet on him, you'll lose another tenner.
I’m well and truly resigned to the idea of PM Boris.
*ass
simonipswich1
Posts: 24
Joined: Sat 30 Apr, 2016 00.24

Mon 17 Jun, 2019 09.28

tillyoshea wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 17.17
simonipswich1 wrote:
Sun 16 Jun, 2019 12.42
Just a thought and I don't know if it would be possible. The day before the new leader is announced, could May go to Buckingham Palace and ask for permission to dissolve Parliament trigging a General Election? It is said that the Queen doesn't get involved really in politics and leaves that up to her Prime Minister?
No. The Prime Minister lost the prerogative to reuqest a dissolution of Parliament under the Fixed Term Parliaments Act. It now requires a vote of two-thirds of the Commons (or a situation where the Government loses a confidence vote and there is a period of two weeks where no alternative Government emerges to command the confidence of the Commons).

I mean, I'm sure the monarch could theoretically dissolve a Parliament at will, but we'd be well into Charles I territory if it happened in the circumstances outlined.

And - as Phil says - why would May want to do that anyway?!
Why would she want to do that? I suppose to stick two fingers up at the Party and Parliament!
Post Reply