iPhone 7 etc

all new Phil
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I don't really understand why people get so bothered either way. I've got an iPhone 6. It's alright. I can call people and use apps and stuff.

If anything I think we're probably reaching the stage where there isn't much more they can do to evolve phones, short of embedding them into our hands or something. Anything new now seems more of a gimmick than a genuine game changer. I can't really imagine what more I would want to do with my phone than I can do already.

But then, people probably thought the same of their Nokia 3210.
Thought this was a nice forum, clearly not.
james2001
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They'll think of something, and the Apple fanboys will be camping outside of Apple stores to get it!
bilky asko
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all new Phil wrote:I don't really understand why people get so bothered either way. I've got an iPhone 6. It's alright. I can call people and use apps and stuff.

If anything I think we're probably reaching the stage where there isn't much more they can do to evolve phones, short of embedding them into our hands or something. Anything new now seems more of a gimmick than a genuine game changer. I can't really imagine what more I would want to do with my phone than I can do already.

But then, people probably thought the same of their Nokia 3210.
The one thing I can think of immediately is battery technology. If Dyson end up cracking it, we may end up with a Dyson PH01 phone.
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Alexia
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Which would simultaneously suck and blow.
Philip
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Ten years ago today…

viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3955
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MetalGearRex
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Joined: Thu 10 Nov, 2016 15.25

Thought this was relevant to post - but said news will have an effect on thousands of applications on the App Store, as well as Apple's approach towards 32-bit app support.

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2017- ... e-obselete

iOS 11's minimum device benchmark, of course, is the 5S, and is tipped to end support completely for 32-bit applications.

I guess we should have seen it coming from iOS 10.3, which gave warnings about 32-bit apps not working with future versions. The only way to salvage some of these apps is essentially, the developer giving their apps a 64 bit update, but some have shuttered, so no chance of some apps being updated.

Personally, I understand Apple's intentions to utilise the 64-bit architecture completely, but with that, creates a quagmire of lost apps, rendered obsolete.
Dr Lobster*
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i've never really bothered experimenting with any software development with apple devices (you need a mac to do the build, even in visual studio)... but i assumed that ios apps were like android apps in that they are compiled to an abstract hardware agnostic intermediate byte code and then compiled to native on the device?

it's one of the good things about android, java and the .net platform that you really don't need to worry about platform architecture with things like word length and endianness just lurking to catch you out.
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lukey
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Dr Lobster* wrote: Tue 11 Apr, 2017 23.02 i've never really bothered experimenting with any software development with apple devices (you need a mac to do the build, even in visual studio)... but i assumed that ios apps were like android apps in that they are compiled to an abstract hardware agnostic intermediate byte code and then compiled to native on the device?

it's one of the good things about android, java and the .net platform that you really don't need to worry about platform architecture with things like word length and endianness just lurking to catch you out.
Nah, xcodebuild produces separate binaries which are compiled against armv7 or arm64, and these can be combined into a universal package. The lack of a managed runtime and its corresponding overhead is the main reason iOS devices generally ship with less RAM than comparable Android ones. Although, it's worth pointing out that Android APKs still contain bytecode that distinctly targets armv7 and arm64, it just seems to be handled more automagically by the toolchain unless the dev actually needs some architecture-specific data structures.
Dr Lobster*
Posts: 2013
Joined: Sat 30 Aug, 2003 20.14

thanks for that lukey - very interesting. i recall apple using universal binaries on macos some years ago - it makes sense they used the same approach with ios.

although you don't get the raw performance you get with native code with c# and .net framework languages, the managed runtime just makes things so much easier and less fiddly, not just with garbage collection or reference counting (which i believe objective c has) but dynamic features like reflection, type inference and linq. i'm amazed at how complete modern runtimes and their runtime libraries are and how they abstract away so much - there are pros and cons, but it actually makes you just have to concentrate on the problem you set out to solve in the first place - i've only played around with xaramin on android - it's pretty neat being able to share so much code (although the device emulators are pretty slow).

i'm old enough to remember the days of plotting out graphics on graph paper to workout the bitmask and then pokeing them into memory to get an image, let alone where we are now where i can zip, encrypt, email files, etc with less than an a4 page of code.
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