Windows 9 is now Windows 10

cwathen
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Wow! How have I never heard of this feature ever before??!!??
Alexia
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Because Nick put it there himself. Clue's under his avatar. He only reveals the truth to CERTAIN people.
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Nick Harvey
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Hehe! That's a bottle of Communion/Cotes du Rhone Wine you owe me, next time I'm down that way, Chris!

Oh, and also have 100 kudos points for your first ever one line post!
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AJ
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The internal preview builds are a lot more stable than the public ones. Expect some better stability in the next few builds when they're pushed out in the coming weeks.
cwathen
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AJ wrote:The internal preview builds are a lot more stable than the public ones. Expect some better stability in the next few builds when they're pushed out in the coming weeks.
The internal builds, the ones that haven't been through all the steps necessary to be made public, are more stable than the public ones, the ones they are trying to use to sell the operating system? This is based on what exactly?

I was going to do another potted list of changes in the latest build, 10130. But that's been out a few weeks now and will likely be updated in the coming days, and there's more than enough resources elsewhere on the internet doing the same thing. That and it's getting boring when little changes.

As with the 'we will upgrade those on pirated Windows 7...oh now we won't' debacle of a few months ago, Microsoft have muddied the water again this week by implying free upgrades that they won't deliver - after stating that the 'Windows Insiders' (those brave souls who've run the preview versions for the last 9 months) absolutely will not be getting a free copy of Windows 10 as a thank you, they did a U-turn last week and announced that those running the preview *will* see their preview updated to the RTM build when it becomes available, which is likely to be before the July 29 launch date and so make them the first to actually run the finished OS.

Just as I thought this meant I'd bagged myself a copy of Windows 10 Pro and would definitely be able to move to a 64 bit Windows, Microsoft did another U-turn, and explained that what they actually meant is that the preview versions would update to RTM code, but these will still be unlicensed versions constrained by the end date for the insider programme. So it still remains the case that the free upgrade offer is only for bonefide Windows 7/8 users.

It also seems that after confirming clean installs would be possible for those who took a free upgrade, a 'clean install' might actually mean using the built in recovery options to factory reset a buggered installation, and may not literally mean being able to install from scratch using a DVD, and still the issue of whether you can move from a 32 bit Windows 7/8 to a 64 bit Windows 10 is not being answered.
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AJ
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The internal builds, the ones that haven't been through all the steps necessary to be made public, are more stable than the public ones, the ones they are trying to use to sell the operating system? This is based on what exactly?
Based on working there, and using a later build than one which is public at present.

Should be pushed out to the fast ring soon.
cwathen
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AJ wrote:
The internal builds, the ones that haven't been through all the steps necessary to be made public, are more stable than the public ones, the ones they are trying to use to sell the operating system? This is based on what exactly?
Based on working there, and using a later build than one which is public at present.

Should be pushed out to the fast ring soon.
That flies in the face of how Microsoft has publically stated the insider programme works. The availability or not of a public build is not supposed to be based on whether or not Microsoft graciously chose to push that build out, it's supposed to be based purely on the quality of the build.

There are supposed to be daily builds pushed internally to a very small group of people, which if passed get pushed to the OS group, which if passed get pushed to the wider Microsoft employee base, which if passed then go public on the fast ring and then finally the slow ring depending on how the fast ring push goes. There were exceptions put in place for things like testing new features not deemed ready enough for public consumption but Windows 10 is now feature complete so this isn't going to apply any more.

Few builds make it to public because most aren't good enough. Therefore it shouldn't be possible for you to make a statement like 'the internal builds are a lot more stable than the public ones', because if you and your brethren have signed off on it as a goodie in that way then it should already be on fast ring.

What job do you do at Microsoft exactly?
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AJ
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cwathen wrote:What job do you do at Microsoft exactly?
That's nothing you need to concern yourself with.

I was just posting my experience of using the internal dogfood builds in my day to day life at Microsoft, along with Office Gemini etc etc. I also happen to be using the public preview builds on my home laptop which I am posting on right now. I was simply sharing my experience, which is that the later build I am currently using at work is much more stable than the one which I am using at home (on the fast ring).

I never stated that I know how the internal builds work vs the external public preview builds, and I have nothing to do with the development of Windows or the push-out of the builds. All I know is that my Lenovo Helix device which I use at work is on the internal preview ring, and that it is a different and later build to the public build.

Don't believe it? Well, frankly, I couldn't care less.
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WillPS
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cwathen wrote:
AJ wrote:
The internal builds, the ones that haven't been through all the steps necessary to be made public, are more stable than the public ones, the ones they are trying to use to sell the operating system? This is based on what exactly?
Based on working there, and using a later build than one which is public at present.

Should be pushed out to the fast ring soon.
That flies in the face of how Microsoft has publically stated the insider programme works. The availability or not of a public build is not supposed to be based on whether or not Microsoft graciously chose to push that build out, it's supposed to be based purely on the quality of the build.

There are supposed to be daily builds pushed internally to a very small group of people, which if passed get pushed to the OS group, which if passed get pushed to the wider Microsoft employee base, which if passed then go public on the fast ring and then finally the slow ring depending on how the fast ring push goes. There were exceptions put in place for things like testing new features not deemed ready enough for public consumption but Windows 10 is now feature complete so this isn't going to apply any more.

Few builds make it to public because most aren't good enough. Therefore it shouldn't be possible for you to make a statement like 'the internal builds are a lot more stable than the public ones', because if you and your brethren have signed off on it as a goodie in that way then it should already be on fast ring.

What job do you do at Microsoft exactly?
LOL.
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bilky asko
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WillPS wrote:LOL.
Going by cwathen's novella on the hierarchy of Windows 10 build releases, it makes perfect sense (as far as I can tell) that AJ is on a later build than the public one, rather flying in the face of the hierarchy.
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cwathen
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bilky asko wrote:
WillPS wrote:LOL.
Going by cwathen's novella on the hierarchy of Windows 10 build releases, it makes perfect sense (as far as I can tell) that AJ is on a later build than the public one, rather flying in the face of the hierarchy.
Whether or not I believe AJ works for Microsoft when he was working in a Vodafone uniform 6 months ago is neither here nor there - I couldn't care less if it's true any more than he could care less about whether or not I believe it. Of course there are newer builds than the public build and of course it makes sense that a Microsoft employee would be on a later build.

The issue I took was claiming that 'the internal builds are more stable than the public' (note: 'builds' as in there has been more than one that's more stable than 10130) - essentially saying that they're keeping the good stuff to themselves. Since the release schedules changed, builds are supposed to be pushed out to the fast ring once validated by the Microsofties. We've been stuck on 10130 for almost a month and 10130 has now been pushed to the slow ring without anything new coming onto the fast ring, which is the longest we've been left on the same build since the change in release schedule.

If there have indeed been a number of superior and more stable builds since, then surely we shouldn't have been left on 10130 for this long? That is what I meant.
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