Lovely Lightbulbs

Alexia
Posts: 2967
Joined: Sat 01 Oct, 2005 17.50

Sun 17 May, 2015 16.16

BUMP

While looking at outdoor solar lights (http://www.diy.com/departments/blooma-g ... 894_BQ.prd) we were confused by the IPX rating and by advice of a member of staff that anything with IPX4 rating (splashproof) should be brought inside in rainy weather.

Our confusion was exacerbated by the fact that some other solar lights that you spike into the ground (and thus presumably are semi-permanent) were also IPX4 rated.

The jar design is such that it has a rubber seal inside the "lid" where the solar panel is keeping any wiring and the battery box watertight. Other "rock"and "frog" outdoor lights were also IPX4 rated.

So my question is - was the member of staff being overly cautious and can we in fact leave these items outside in rainy conditions? Or are IPX4 rated products really not rainproof?
cwathen
Posts: 1117
Joined: Fri 15 Aug, 2003 17.28

Sun 17 May, 2015 16.41

The 'splash proof' rating of IPX4 is still a pretty hefty rating - the item needs to be able to withstand being subjected to water from any direction at a rate of 120 litres/hour with no water ingress, it's certainly not just a few drops splashed on it - that would come under IPX1/2. All but the most torrential of torrential rain should be fine with IPX4.

IPX5 and 6 involves the use of pressurised jets, I doubt much rain will approach that kind of pressure.

True waterproofing (ie submersion) doesn't start till IPX7.
thegeek
Posts: 522
Joined: Sat 04 Jun, 2005 12.35

Tue 07 Jul, 2015 17.07

We're getting our kitchen done at the moment and I've been looking at under-cabinet worktop lighting.

I was browsing Ikea as the default option, but it's coming out at about £165 for 2 metres worth of OMLOPP (it's bumped up a bit because of the slightly awkward cabinet placement meaning we need two transformers).

It seems decent and sturdy though - is it a case of you get what you pay for, versus something like this from Screwfix? Is there somewhere else I ought to be looking?
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Ebeneezer Scrooge
Posts: 323
Joined: Tue 23 Sep, 2003 13.53
Location: Scrooge Towers

Wed 08 Jul, 2015 18.42

I ordered this for my son's bedroom:
http://cpc.farnell.com/flexoled/flex01p ... dp/DP33007

While the white on this one sucks (in terms of colour temperature) because it's been compromised for the ability to mix colours, the build quality and light output is excellent. This video suggests that the warm white tapes have a reasonable colour temperature.

You can cut them and use cheap wiring (like a couple of pairs of speaker wire) soldered to the terminals if you want to bridge a gap too.

Worth a look at least.
Snarky
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Gavin Scott
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Joined: Fri 15 Aug, 2003 13.16
Location: Edinburgh

Thu 09 Jul, 2015 12.55

Tell me you didn't pay £30 odd quid? CPC prices are utterly shocking. Total ripoff.

I used to import these LED strips. They're all pretty good quality these days - even the cheap ones use decent Epstar 5050 diodes. I've mounted them all over the flat. Behind sofas, bookcases and my monitors (pictured) creating soft glowing colour. The place looks like the nightclub in Xanadu but I love it. After a couple of years I've lost a bit of effectiveness on the blue element of one of the strips, but you don't notice it.

Other members might want to browse onto Wish or Geek (apps in the iStore etc) for buying from China direct. Costs about a third of the price. Post arrives in a jiffy bag in about 10 days. Keep in mind that they do generate heat (despite the common understanding that LEDs don't) so you must keep an eye on where you mount them.

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bilky asko
Posts: 1113
Joined: Sat 08 Nov, 2008 19.48

Thu 09 Jul, 2015 15.24

I'm not sure if I've mentioned it before, but I got some remote controlled GU10 LED colour changing bulbs a couple of years ago. I managed to break one of them by leaving it in colour-change mode (the heat killed it, I reckon - the lens on the bulb was cold, but the heat fins were bloody hot).

Speaking of LEDs, would you like an LED lamp that lasts 37 years?
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Gavin Scott
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Location: Edinburgh

Thu 09 Jul, 2015 15.33

You have to look at the cost benefit analysis of Dyson products though. In a domestic environment I would rather replace an item six times and still have saved money. You end up with incremental improvements in products over time. That said, if I were a wealthy man I'd buy the Dyson anyway.

I recommend using aluminium channel as a heatsink for LED strips if its a long term installation. There are tons of suppliers of it now.

https://www.led-lighthouse.co.uk/led-st ... um-profile
bilky asko
Posts: 1113
Joined: Sat 08 Nov, 2008 19.48

Thu 09 Jul, 2015 15.40

If the 37 years is accurate, that's £10.78 for every year you'd get out of it.

If I had £399 going spare I'd buy one tomorrow.

EDIT: A quick search reveals that they can be acquired quite a bit cheaper than that.
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Ebeneezer Scrooge
Posts: 323
Joined: Tue 23 Sep, 2003 13.53
Location: Scrooge Towers

Thu 09 Jul, 2015 17.09

Gavin Scott wrote:Tell me you didn't pay £30 odd quid? CPC prices are utterly shocking. Total ripoff.
Not £30, but also not the £11 you found. There were in one of the sale catalogues and I think they were somewhere around £15-20 at that time.
Snarky
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